Lizeth’s Picks – Volume 1

You get a lot of interesting responses when you ask people to name some of their favorite horror movies.

Some people enjoy horror movies for their humor or satire, others for the genuine frightfulness they invoke, still others just love watching the imagination of another person(s) run wild on the screen.
Last night my wife and I got into a discussion about horror movies and which ones we consider our favorites. She grew up watching monster movies as a child. My mother-in-law apparently forced her to watch all the scary films. My wife claims it scared her for life, something she stills teases my mother-in-law about to this day.
So here are some of her favorites and why she finds them so enjoyable:

   

sci-fi horror, space epic, time travel, monster and phycological mystery 
“Fun movie, that has an interesting setting. Shows how vulnerable the human mind is when put in a hopeless situation. Humans need each other, being alone can make a person snap.”



Horror slasher movie. Serial killers and survivalists. 
“The twist, that the girl is a survivalist. Seems girly but she’s badass.”


The Blob remake 1988. Sci-fi horror monster movie. 
“I like movies that leave you scared after their over. The Blob is something so empty, without reason. It doesn’t have a voice, it doesn’t have a face, it doesn’t have a shape. And it can go anywhere. It’s not killing because it’s enjoys killing, it’s eating. It’s following its instincts.”


Zombie love movie that has a beating heart. 
“I like the idea that love can be so strong it brings a zombie back to life so he can pursue his love.”


slasher serial  killer horror . Lots of teens die. 
“Suspenseful horror movie that keeps you on your toes. You never know who the killer is, every time you think you’ll figured it out you’re wrong. It makes you jump. Even though it’s a slasher movie it’s easy to watch because it’s so entertaining, Matthew Lillard is a hoot.”


Vampire gangster mash-up that is action packed, bloody as hell and down right fun. 
“I like how even though the main characters are two criminals and a Christian family, they come together to ward off evil. It shows how humans will come together no matter their differences to defeat a common enemy.”

sci-fi horror alien invasion movie, with clowns as the creepy monsters “I like it because I don’t like clowns and the clowns are creepy. They are so ugly it’s almost funny to watch them. They used clown cliques really well. The cotton candy cocoons that harvest human blood are cool and the circus tent space ship is inviting, not threatening. Everyone loves the circus so it’s the perfect trap.”
Thanks Bonita!

Horrific Wedding Cake.

Wow. I’m not sure what’s more disturbing, the cake or the fact they had it made for their wedding. Pretty awesome either way. Wonder what flavor they are…

Name That Movie!!!

What movie is this gif from?

1) American Werewolf in London
2) Evil Dead 2
3) Demons
4) Let Sleeping Corpses Lie

Answer in the comments and we will give you all sorts of kudos!

Why is Nightmare on Elm Street such a terrifying film?

Okay, let’s first acknowledge all those out there who find Elm Street to be a silly movie with little of value to the horror genre, or think the movie is actually a comedy saddled with unnecessarily adult themes.


Feel acknowledged? Good because you’re all boring people who lack any type of creativity and/or ability to empathize. Seriously, can you try to get yourselves lost in a movie or are you just too cool for that sort of thing. Quit ruining it for everyone.


Apologies for the degression, but we here at Raw Movie Reviews take our movies seriously, except our comedies. We taken them less seriously. And the Scary Movie Franchise, we take that even less seriously. Anyway, you get the point – horror movies are scary or terrifying or heavy or just plain fun.


This leads us into Nightmare on Elm Street. The 1984 version mind you, as if there was any question. The movie is scary. The subject matter is on a basic level is disturbing in and of itself. Child abduction and murder is unfortunately a common occurrence in our society, or any society for that matter, so why make movies about a child murderer?


Well for one, if you want to experience feelings and emotions related to the terrible things in life but do not want to actually live through them,  or sift through police case files and crime scene photos, or listen to interviews with convicted child murders then your only option is the imagination.


The imagination of others is always the best experience because we cannot manipulate it ourselves. There is no way for us to stop the creative process if we are unhappy with the product and no way to anticipate the ending if it doesn’t belong to us personally.


It’s similar to the concept that food prepared for you always tastes better than food you’ve prepared yourself. It’s true.


Think about it next time you eat food prepared for you, whether it be your significant other or at a restaurant. Look at your plate and think to yourself, “Would this food be better if I prepared it myself?”  – and if you’re eating at Golden Corral then the answer is obviously yes and you are disqualified from this discussion.


So, what have we concluded here?  A Nightmare on Elm Street is scary because food prepared by someone else is always better than food you prepare yourself.

Makes sense to us.

Why is Nightmare on Elm Street such a terrifying film?

Okay, let’s first acknowledge all those out there who find Elm Street to be a silly movie with little of value to the horror genre, or think the movie is actually a comedy saddled with unnecessarily adult themes.


Feel acknowledged? Good because you’re all boring people who lack any type of creativity and/or ability to empathize. Seriously, can you try to get yourselves lost in a movie or are you just too cool for that sort of thing. Quit ruining it for everyone.


Apologies for the degression, but we here at Raw Movie Reviews take our movies seriously, except our comedies. We taken them less seriously. And the Scary Movie Franchise, we take that even less seriously. Anyway, you get the point – horror movies are scary or terrifying or heavy or just plain fun.


This leads us into Nightmare on Elm Street. The 1984 version mind you, as if there was any question. The movie is scary. The subject matter is on a basic level is disturbing in and of itself. Child abduction and murder is unfortunately a common occurrence in our society, or any society for that matter, so why make movies about a child murderer?


Well for one, if you want to experience feelings and emotions related to the terrible things in life but do not want to actually live through them,  or sift through police case files and crime scene photos, or listen to interviews with convicted child murders then your only option is the imagination.


The imagination of others is always the best experience because we cannot manipulate it ourselves. There is no way for us to stop the creative process if we are unhappy with the product and no way to anticipate the ending if it doesn’t belong to us personally.


It’s similar to the concept that food prepared for you always tastes better than food you’ve prepared yourself. It’s true.


Think about it next time you eat food prepared for you, whether it be your significant other or at a restaurant. Look at your plate and think to yourself, “Would this food be better if I prepared it myself?”  – and if you’re eating at Golden Corral then the answer is obviously yes and you are disqualified from this discussion.


So, what have we concluded here?  A Nightmare on Elm Street is scary because food prepared by someone else is always better than food you prepare yourself.

Makes sense to us.