All posts by Cthulhuwho

Slightly odd. Intrigued by creativity. Lover of cheese. Nothing beats a great movie. Few things beat a great book. Lot of things beat working for a living.

Why is Nightmare on Elm Street such a terrifying film?

Okay, let’s first acknowledge all those out there who find Elm Street to be a silly movie with little of value to the horror genre, or think the movie is actually a comedy saddled with unnecessarily adult themes.


Feel acknowledged? Good because you’re all boring people who lack any type of creativity and/or ability to empathize. Seriously, can you try to get yourselves lost in a movie or are you just too cool for that sort of thing. Quit ruining it for everyone.


Apologies for the degression, but we here at Raw Movie Reviews take our movies seriously, except our comedies. We taken them less seriously. And the Scary Movie Franchise, we take that even less seriously. Anyway, you get the point – horror movies are scary or terrifying or heavy or just plain fun.


This leads us into Nightmare on Elm Street. The 1984 version mind you, as if there was any question. The movie is scary. The subject matter is on a basic level is disturbing in and of itself. Child abduction and murder is unfortunately a common occurrence in our society, or any society for that matter, so why make movies about a child murderer?


Well for one, if you want to experience feelings and emotions related to the terrible things in life but do not want to actually live through them,  or sift through police case files and crime scene photos, or listen to interviews with convicted child murders then your only option is the imagination.


The imagination of others is always the best experience because we cannot manipulate it ourselves. There is no way for us to stop the creative process if we are unhappy with the product and no way to anticipate the ending if it doesn’t belong to us personally.


It’s similar to the concept that food prepared for you always tastes better than food you’ve prepared yourself. It’s true.


Think about it next time you eat food prepared for you, whether it be your significant other or at a restaurant. Look at your plate and think to yourself, “Would this food be better if I prepared it myself?”  – and if you’re eating at Golden Corral then the answer is obviously yes and you are disqualified from this discussion.


So, what have we concluded here?  A Nightmare on Elm Street is scary because food prepared by someone else is always better than food you prepare yourself.

Makes sense to us.

Why is Nightmare on Elm Street such a terrifying film?

Okay, let’s first acknowledge all those out there who find Elm Street to be a silly movie with little of value to the horror genre, or think the movie is actually a comedy saddled with unnecessarily adult themes.


Feel acknowledged? Good because you’re all boring people who lack any type of creativity and/or ability to empathize. Seriously, can you try to get yourselves lost in a movie or are you just too cool for that sort of thing. Quit ruining it for everyone.


Apologies for the degression, but we here at Raw Movie Reviews take our movies seriously, except our comedies. We taken them less seriously. And the Scary Movie Franchise, we take that even less seriously. Anyway, you get the point – horror movies are scary or terrifying or heavy or just plain fun.


This leads us into Nightmare on Elm Street. The 1984 version mind you, as if there was any question. The movie is scary. The subject matter is on a basic level is disturbing in and of itself. Child abduction and murder is unfortunately a common occurrence in our society, or any society for that matter, so why make movies about a child murderer?


Well for one, if you want to experience feelings and emotions related to the terrible things in life but do not want to actually live through them,  or sift through police case files and crime scene photos, or listen to interviews with convicted child murders then your only option is the imagination.


The imagination of others is always the best experience because we cannot manipulate it ourselves. There is no way for us to stop the creative process if we are unhappy with the product and no way to anticipate the ending if it doesn’t belong to us personally.


It’s similar to the concept that food prepared for you always tastes better than food you’ve prepared yourself. It’s true.


Think about it next time you eat food prepared for you, whether it be your significant other or at a restaurant. Look at your plate and think to yourself, “Would this food be better if I prepared it myself?”  – and if you’re eating at Golden Corral then the answer is obviously yes and you are disqualified from this discussion.


So, what have we concluded here?  A Nightmare on Elm Street is scary because food prepared by someone else is always better than food you prepare yourself.

Makes sense to us.

Raw Review: The Returned (2014)


This has really gotten out of hand and we (the mass audiences) have no one to blame but everyone else for letting it get as far as it has. So disclaimer…


Zombies are fun. Zombies are scary. Zombies are versatile. Zombies will get worn out eventually. Zombies will never, ever go away as a horror sub-genre. Zombies are especially cool when a new and creative take on the zombie trope is created.

Zombie infection social issues hate groups we love it.



The Returned presents a new and very interesting take on the zombie sub-genre. Basically, zombie-ism is a disease that is transmitted via fluid exchange between a living human and someone with the zombie virus. Yeah that’s not exactly new, but where this film gets interesting is that big pharma has figured out a way to harvest antibodies to the disease. They are given to infected people which keeps them from dying and coming back as flesh eating assholes.


Where the film gets really really interesting is it’s focus on societies reaction to the ‘Returned’ and how people living with the disease go about their day to day. Think about it. If your neighbor was infected with a zombie virus that required daily doses of antiviral medications to keep them from turning into a dangerous flesh eating monster how would you feel?


Would you let your kids go next door and play? Would you trust your neighbor to pick up their monthly medication and take it diligently each day? What if they were forgetful? Or just unorganized?


Scary right?


Well what if the big pharma companies started running out of the antiviral drugs? Queue panic!


The Returned is a very intelligent film that sets out to tell a story about living life with a dangerous and misunderstood disease. Themes of discrimination, class inequality, and prejudice are strong but subtle. They emerge naturally as part of a well written story, never intentionally and never artificially.


Q: Is there blood and guts and zombie madness in this movie?
A: Yes, there is zombie horror in the film, but the truly scary parts of the film come from how regular people react to the world in which they live. Remember, in any zombie apocalypse people are more dangerous than the actual zombies.


Q: Anyone I know in the film?
A:  Kris Holden-Ried. He was in the Tudors, Underworld: Awakening, and a bunch of other stuff.


Q: Is it a good movie for the whole family?
A: The movie has a moderately slow pace. It’s engrossing and maintains tension from beginning to end, but anyone who wants lots and lots of action and/or guts might get a little impatient.


Q: Looks like a dark depressing film?
A: It’s dark. The relationships are strong and chemistry strong enough that it balances in places, but the film is grim from beginning to end and there is one scene in a hospital that is really gut wrenching. Happens off screen but it’s powerful nonetheless.


Q: Worth seeing?
A: Yes. The ending is fantastic and completely unexpected.

The Returned (2014) – Raw Review

This has really gotten out of hand and we (the mass audiences) have no one to blame but everyone else for letting it get as far as it has. So disclaimer…

Zombies are fun. Zombies are scary. Zombies are versatile. Zombies will get worn out eventually. Zombies will never, ever go away as a horror sub-genre. Zombies are especially cool when a new and creative take on the zombie trope is created.

Zombie infection social issues hate groups we love it.

The Returned presents a new and very interesting take on the zombie sub-genre. Basically, zombie-ism is a disease that is transmitted via fluid exchange between a living human and someone with the zombie virus. Yeah that’s not exactly new, but where this film gets interesting is that big pharma has figured out a way to harvest antibodies to the disease. They are given to infected people which keeps them from dying and coming back as flesh eating assholes.

Where the film gets really really interesting is it’s focus on societies reaction to the ‘Returned’ and how people living with the disease go about their day to day. Think about it. If your neighbor was infected with a zombie virus that required daily doses of antiviral medications to keep them from turning into a dangerous flesh eating monster how would you feel?

Would you let your kids go next door and play? Would you trust your neighbor to pick up their monthly medication and take it diligently each day? What if they were forgetful? Or just unorganized?

Scary right?

Well what if the big pharma companies started running out of the antiviral drugs? Queue panic!

The Returned is a very intelligent film that sets out to tell a story about living life with a dangerous and misunderstood disease. Themes of discrimination, class inequality, and prejudice are strong but subtle. They emerge naturally as part of a well written story, never intentionally and never artificially.

Q: Is there blood and guts and zombie madness in this movie?

A: Yes, there is zombie horror in the film, but the truly scary parts of the film come from how regular people react to the world in which they live. Remember, in any zombie apocalypse people are more dangerous than the actual zombies.

Q: Anyone I know in the film?

A:  Kris Holden-Ried. He was in the Tudors, Underworld: Awakening, and a bunch of other stuff.

Q: Is it a good movie for the whole family?

A: The movie has a moderately slow pace. It’s engrossing and maintains tension from beginning to end, but anyone who wants lots and lots of action and/or guts might get a little impatient.

Q: Looks like a dark depressing film?

A: It’s dark. The relationships are strong and chemistry strong enough that it balances in places, but the film is grim from beginning to end and there is one scene in a hospital that is really gut wrenching. Happens off screen but it’s powerful nonetheless.

Q: Worth seeing?

A: Yes. The ending is fantastic and completely unexpected.

Fangoria Question of the Day!

What kind of question is that? Obviously the answer is: 

Tweet Reanimator to @Fangoria @Rawmoviereviews and watch the glory that is Twitter implode!

The Disco Exorcist?? WTF

Are all genres open to mash-ups? Think carefully before checking out this review provided courtesy of LoveHorror.

Interestingly enough this movie was released on October 13th, 2014. You didn’t know that? Its okay, not sure anyone else did either.  

Still, it looks like it might be worth wasting an hour and a half on. I mean come on, horror movies are what life is all about right?

Trailer if you’re interested. 

The Disco Exorcist?? WTF

Are all genres open to mash-ups? Think carefully before checking out this review provided courtesy of LoveHorror.

Interestingly enough this movie was released on October 13th, 2014. You didn’t know that? Its okay, not sure anyone else did either.  

Still, it looks like it might be worth wasting an hour and a half on. I mean come on, horror movies are what life is all about right?

Trailer if you’re interested. 

Movie Review – (Return of) The Aliens Deadly Spawn (1983)

Alien monsters eat and kill and breed. Awesome fun!Aliens Deadly Spawn is a product of the early 80’s fascination with fake blood and giant latex monsters. Filming on  a meager budget of just $25,000 dollars (approx $59,000 today) director Douglas McKeown does wonders with what would otherwise be a total crap-fest. 

Fans of monster movies will love this film. Fans of bloody b-movies will love this film. Fans of anything 80’s will love this film. Basically, anyone who actually found their way to this blog and is taking the time to read this review will love this film. 

The most successful film formula back then (and probably today as well) is the single location, limited cast, horror film. Wondering why? Simple:

  • Single location means the studio doesn’t need to spend a lot of money renting locations or moving everything around. It also means the director doesn’t need to spend months in pre-production scouting locations. 
  • Limited cast means exactly that, limited. Don’t need to spend a lot of money on actors and/or contracts with a small cast. This allows more money for other expenses, or extra money to nail down one well known actor. 
  • Horror film is pretty self explanatory, but because I love to hear myself type I will explain anyway. Horror films are popular, have always been popular, and will always be popular. So if you have a low budget, a decent script, and some people willing to work for almost nothing (or preferably nothing) you have the opportunity to make a film that will be remembered long after you’ve realized your dream doesn’t pay the bills and you go back to working 9-5 somewhere you hate.  

(Return of) The Aliens Deadly Spawn cashes in on all three formulas for success. The film is obviously low budget but you’d never expect it to be $25k! Even today’s inflated rate of $59k is ridiculous when compared to some of the shit sandwiches Hollywood is pumping out with million dollar budgets. 


What makes Deadly Spawn exceptionally fun to watch is the creature effects. Remember this is the pre-CGI era of film making, when practical effects ruled the medium. In this case, the aliens and their spawn are just a pleasure to witness in action. Unlike today’s reliance on CGI everything, these monsters are down right terrifying with their undulating tubular bodies and the wet blood they clearly bathe in each time they score a kill. 



Q: Why the two names? Is it Return of or just Deadly Spawn… You’re confusing me! 
A: The original title was just The Aliens Deadly Spawn, but they changed it to Return of the Aliens Deadly Spawn to cash in on the success of Alien (yes, Ridley Scott’s Alien). I know right, total marketing whores. 

Q: So you’re saying the cheesy monster with the fake blood looks better than a CGI monster does nowadays? 
A: Absolutely, and it makes filming more realistic because the actors are actually interacting with the big monster rather than imagining where it is and what it’s doing. 

Q: This movie look stupid.
A: No you’re stupid. Besides, that’s not a question. 😛 

Q: Good date movie?
A: Yea. It’s fun and campy, lots of blood and body parts but the inclusion of the monster makes it pure sci-fi/fantasy. 

Q: How about the kids?
A: Sure! Get some popcorn and the whole family together. It’s like watching a Disney film only with mass amounts of people eating.      SERIOUSLY??!! Come on, it’s bloody as hell and has body parts in it. My kids will need to wait until they are at least 6 years old. 

Q: Where or where can I get a copy of this?
A: Anywhere. It’s a cult favorite and is available on blue-ray, Amazon, etc. 

The Deadly Spawn (1983) – Raw Review

Aliens Deadly Spawn is a product of the early 80’s fascination with fake blood and giant latex monsters. Filming on  a meager budget of just $25,000 dollars (approx $59,000 today) director Douglas McKeown does wonders with what would otherwise be a total crap-fest.

Fans of monster movies will love this film. Fans of bloody b-movies will love this film. Fans of anything 80’s will love this film. Basically, anyone who actually found their way to this blog and is taking the time to read this review will love this film.The most successful film formula back then (and probably today as well) is the single location, limited cast, horror film. Wondering why? Simple:

  • Single location means the studio doesn’t need to spend a lot of money renting locations or moving everything around. It also means the director doesn’t need to spend months in pre-production scouting locations.
  • Limited cast means exactly that, limited. Don’t need to spend a lot of money on actors and/or contracts with a small cast. This allows more money for other expenses, or extra money to nail down one well known actor.
  • Horror film is pretty self explanatory, but because I love to hear myself type I will explain anyway. Horror films are popular, have always been popular, and will always be popular. So if you have a low budget, a decent script, and some people willing to work for almost nothing (or preferably nothing) you have the opportunity to make a film that will be remembered long after you’ve realized your dream doesn’t pay the bills and you go back to working 9-5 somewhere you hate.

The Deadly Spawn cashes in on all three formulas for success. The film is obviously low budget but you’d never expect it to be $25k! Even today’s inflated rate of $59k is ridiculous when compared to some of the shit sandwiches Hollywood is pumping out with million dollar budgets.

What makes Deadly Spawn exceptionally fun to watch is the creature effects. Remember this is the pre-CGI era of film making, when practical effects ruled the medium. In this case, the aliens and their spawn are just a pleasure to witness in action. Unlike today’s reliance on CGI everything, these monsters are down right terrifying with their undulating tubular bodies and the wet blood they clearly bathe in each time they score a kill.

Q: Why the two names? Is it Return of or just Deadly Spawn… You’re confusing me!
A: The original title was just The Aliens Deadly Spawn, but they changed it to Return of the Aliens Deadly Spawn to cash in on the success of Alien (yes, Ridley Scott’s Alien). I know right, total marketing whores.
Q: So you’re saying the cheesy monster with the fake blood looks better than a CGI monster does nowadays?
A: Absolutely, and it makes filming more realistic because the actors are actually interacting with the big monster rather than imagining where it is and what it’s doing.
Q: This movie look stupid.
A: No you’re stupid. Besides, that’s not a question. 😛 

Q: Good date movie?
A: Yea. It’s fun and campy, lots of blood and body parts but the inclusion of the monster makes it pure sci-fi/fantasy.

Q: How about the kids?
A: Sure! Get some popcorn and the whole family together. It’s like watching a Disney film only with mass amounts of people eating.      SERIOUSLY??!! Come on, it’s bloody as hell and has body parts in it. My kids will need to wait until they are at least 6 years old.

Q: Where or where can I get a copy of this?
A: Anywhere. It’s a cult favorite and is available on blue-ray, Amazon, etc.